The Me Bf 109 G-10

 

From the original to the model

An independent part of the collections of the Aviation Museum Hannover-Laatzen are the more than 1,000 scale models, mainly of the international standards 1/72 and 1/48.

Such true-to-the-original miniatures enable viewers of museum technology history to get an "overview", not only of the individual exhibit (sometimes even as the only possibility of a three-dimensional display if there is no longer a preserved original), but also of lines of development in aircraft construction by means of the possible arrangement and juxtaposition here; sometimes they even close gaps in the presentation of the originals. Their craftsmanship alone is a pleasure to behold.

In our 'Model of the Month' series, this time we present the Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-10, the last version of the standard fighter aircraft built in significant numbers by the German Luftwaffe and its allies in the Second World War.

The Aviation Museum is exhibiting a fully restored G-2 salvaged from the Mediterranean, various examples of the Daimler-Benz DB 601, 603 and 605 engines as well as models of all series of the "109" in the usual scales.

 

The model: The 109 G-10 from Revell in 1/72

Meanwhile already a classic like its prototype is the Revell kit from Bünde with 37 parts plus decal set from the 1990s. Neatly executed, finely detailed and accurately fitting, it gives a choice of two German Luftwaffe aircraft in the last winter of the war. However, we opted for a fighter of the Royal Hungarian Armed Forces from the spring of 1945.

The original: Dying Swan

The "109": designed and put into the air in 1935 under Prof. Willy Messerschmitt at the Bayerische Flugzeugwerke in Augsburg, it is a superlative of aviation. With around 35,000 units it is the most-built German aircraft to date, the world's most-built fighter (probably in total, but at least of all piston engine aircraft) and the aircraft type on which the most aerial victories have been achieved. Record holder and winner of numerous air competitions in the years leading up to World War II, the single-seat all-metal low-wing monoplane with retractable landing gear and enclosed cockpit was a milestone of aviation and the standard fighter of the second German air force. It was also in service with almost all allied and some neutral countries until 1945 - and in some air forces even years beyond.

Cutting-edge technology until the F series and into 1942, the G series was the necessary attempt to balance performance and robustness, diverse tactical profiles, and production simplification of the type. The Focke-Wulf 190 took the performance lead in German fighter armament until the appearance of the Me 262. Enemy developments increasingly outstripped the "109" in terms of design - but the pilots who had become "aces" on it absorbed this loss through familiarity with and confidence in the aircraft, keeping the type in the lead in the operational statistics. Meanwhile, the development team in Augsburg worked feverishly on continuous optimization: fitting more powerful engines and armament into the small airframe without sacrificing aerodynamics. At the same time, the raw material and production situation was becoming increasingly strained, and it was becoming an immense challenge to do so without compromising mass production.

Interception

While the G-6 version was still the classic compromise of performance, operational spectrum and front-line capability, the wartime situation in 1944 allowed only the requirements of pure air defense against a now overwhelming alliance: climb performance, service ceiling, speed and firepower. With the Daimler-Benz DB 605 D, 685 km/h and armament up to a 30 mm MK and two 13 mm MGs, the G-10 was the fastest and most powerful version of the 109, a pure interceptor - and yet only in the hands of experienced pilots equal to the best Allied designs. Aerodynamically cleaner than the G-6 and more similar in appearance to the F series, the wartime situation and the omnipresent shortage of personnel, material and fuel on the German side at the turn of the year 1944/45 mostly leveled out the strengths of this design. Thus, the distinctive engine noise of the G-10 became the swan song not only of the 109, but of the entire Luftwaffe.

Under license

The Royal Hungarian Air Force, Magyar Királyi Légiero in the Hungarian language, continued to receive various aircraft types of German origin until shortly before the end of the war. In addition to the Me Bf 109 of the F and G series, these included significant numbers of the twin-engine Me 210, the Junkers Ju 86 and 87 bombers and the Focke-Wulf Fw 189 close range reconnaissance aircraft.

The Me Bf 109 was also built there under license; some of those examples even went to the German Luftwaffe. The last versions of the 109 to reach the Hungarian Air Force in small numbers were G-14 and G-10. Our model shows one such aircraft from the Battle of Budapest from December 1944 to February 1945; these were the last coordinated missions of the Magyar Királyi Légiero.                                                                    

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109G10 a

A Me Bf 109 G-10 of the Hungarian Air Force from the Revell kit in 1/7

109G10 b

The permanently mounted auxiliary tank was standard from the G series onwards, the DB 605 D together with the heavy armament made an over-painted nose fairing of the G-10 necessa

109G10 c

The last version of the 109 was in service until the end of the war, including the battle for the Hungarian capital.

109G10 d

As with the German Luftwaffe, the colour scheme and markings of the Hungarian aircraft at the end of the war were determined by strict visual protection. The paint on our model was applied was done exclusively by brush.

109G10 e

Only the underside still offered the full nationality markings in spring 1945.

109G10 f

"Family photo": A G-10 of the II. group of JG 7 as provided by the Revell kit and our Hungarian version.

 

The Vought OS2U Kingfisher

 

From the original to the model

An independent part of the collections of the Aviation Museum Hannover-Laatzen are the more than 1,000 scale models, mainly of the international standards 1/72 and 1/48.

Such true-to-the-original miniatures enable viewers of museum technology history to get an "overview", not only of the individual exhibit (sometimes even as the only possibility of a three-dimensional display if there is no longer a preserved original), but also of lines of development in aircraft construction by means of the possible arrangement and juxtaposition here; sometimes they even close gaps in the presentation of the originals. Their craftsmanship alone is a pleasure to behold.

In our 'Model of the Month' series, today we present the Vought OS2U Kingfisher, the first monoplane catapult aircraft of the US Navy and one of the best multi-role naval aircraft in aviation history.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

The model: Back and forth across the sea

Released by US manufacturer mpc from the original 1967 Airfix mold in the 1980s, this was a thoughtful and accurate-fitting, in short, a beautiful 1/72 kit with 65 parts and a choice between a colorful pre-war undercarriage version and the WWII central float version. We built our kit from the large antiquarian collection of the Hannover Aviation Museum.

The original: multi-purpose, worldwide

Designed in 1937, the prototype of this two-seat, multi-role naval aircraft flew in July 1938 with the first production aircraft reaching U.S. Navy task forces two years later. The first American catapult aircraft of monoplane design, it was produced with wheeled landing gear in addition to the main floatplane version, and operated from both afloat units and coastal airfields - as a reconnaissance aircraft, fleet observer and light bomber, as a maritime rescue aircraft, for coastal patrol and for special missions. "Girl Friday" was the word.

A total of more than 1,800 were built in four main versions; the "Kingfisher" was the most widely used catapult aircraft on U.S. cruisers and battleships in the

A total of just over 1,800 were built in four main versions; the "Kingfisher" was the most widely used catapult aircraft on U.S. cruisers and battleships in World War II and was found worldwide, but mostly in the Pacific. The British Royal Navy received about 100 aircraft designated as "Kingfisher Mk I" in 1942 as part of its weapons assistance.

Compact and stable

The OS2U was powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-985-SB3 Wasp Junior radial engine of 450 hp, which gave the aircraft a maximum speed of 274 km/h with a wingspan of 10.95 m, a length of 10.25 m and a takeoff weight of 2,722 kg. Its operational range was 1,850 km. It was armed with a fixed machine gun in the right wing and a movable machine gun for the observer, both of 7.62mm caliber, as well as operational bomb locks under the wings for 2 bombs or depth charges. Like all naval aircraft of compact and sturdy construction, it successfully withstood rough seas as well as enemy fire - and was thus correspondingly popular with its crews.

The Kingfisher was held in even greater esteem by all those airmen shot down or killed in accidents who were rescued by this aircraft and its crew, and is thus remembered not only as the "eye of the fleet" but also as a lifesaver for the U.S. Navy.  

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Kingfisher a

The OS2U Kingfisher with central and support floats from mpc in 1/72.

Kingfisher b

The canopies were usually partially open even in flight - in the event of an emergency, this ensured quick disembarkation...

Kingfisher c

To move the float version on land, running wheels were mounted - not to be confused with the real landing gear of the land-based version.

Kingfisher d

Robust and stocky, yet purposefully constructed and thoroughly well-proportioned: the Kingfisher ("Kingfisher") was a successful design.

Kingfisher e

Bottom view of the OS2U with drop weapons - the type also proved itself in armed reconnaissance and as a jamming aircraft.

Kingfisher f

Sea water and sunlight affected the paintwork and made frequent touch-ups necessary. Note the flexible MG under the canopy parts that slide open in opposite directions.

Die Avia C-2

Avia C 2 01

The Avia C-2 in 1/72 scale. Here in service of the VZLU Letnany until 1958 - and without German MG 17 in the nose.

 

Avia C 2 01 

In front of the hangar... Besides the Czech Republic, France also produced the Arado 96 and exported it to third countries under its own name after WWII.

 

The Model: The Avia C-2 from KP in 1/72.

This was a solid 32 piece plus decal kit from Kovozávody Prostejov (KP) of the then CSSR in 1980. Neatly executed, finely detailed and quite accurate in fit, it gives a choice of three Czechoslovak aviation aircraft from 1948 to 1958. A detailed, multilingual assembly and color manual including a historical sketch round out the good overall impression.

The kit was part of a series of about 15 kits, which collected aircraft models in Czechoslovakian colors from the 1920s to the 1970s - both local development and licensed as well as assigned types.

Our photo series shows a model of an aircraft of the Czechoslovak Aviation Research and Testing Institute ("VZLU") from the second half of the 1950s - used for purely aerodynamic studies, but still in military colors, while the division into a civil and military branch of the institution had already begun. 

Avia C 2 01

The model reflects the elegant as well as functional lines of the design. The color scheme of this C-2 follows the Czechoslovak Air Force pattern of the time, and the nose MG is installed.

 

The original:             Arado 96B to Avia C-2: New "Papers"

In 1938, the two-seat Arado Ar 96 designed by Walter Blume took off from the ground for the first time, and the following year what was probably the most modern training aircraft of its time entered service with the German Luftwaffe. With design and performance features adapted to the operational models - all-metal low-wing with enclosed cabin, retractable landing gear, radio and various equipment sets - the aircraft allowed top-level training. It was even used for light frontline duties during the Second World War.

 

Outsourced

A few examples of the A-series were followed by more than 2,800 units of the B-series, which was more heavily powered with the Argus As 410 A-1. In line with general practice, large-scale production of these aircraft was outsourced to aircraft factories in the satellite states or occupied countries in order to relieve the German armaments factories.

Avia-Flugzeugwerke in Prague was designated to produce the Ar 96. Already experienced in building under license, the factories, founded in 1919, took up large-scale production of the Ar 96  from 1940 onwards,  supplemented by the Messerschmitt Bf 109 in the course of the war.

Avia C 2 01
The kit from KP did not need to fear any comparison with western kits at that time.

 

Heritage item

After the war, production continued almost without interruption, but under a new name. A good 400 more of the design, now called the Avia C-2, were produced until 1949. Exports of this "heirloom" went to Bulgaria, Hungary and other owners in the then Eastern Bloc. In the CSR itself, the type was the standard type of the air force for training as well as for police, border protection and support tasks until 1955, gradually replaced by Soviet and own designs.

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Avia C 2 01

Our Avia C-2 in sky blue. Note the pitot tube and landing light under the wings.

The best for last:  The Fokker D VII

Fok DVII a

The Fokker D VII in 1/72 from Revell. The original 104 years, the model kit about half as old, and this example was built about 30 years ago...

From Original to the Modell

An independent part of the collections of the Aviation Museum Hanover-Laatzen are the more than 1,000 scale models, mainly of the international standards 1/72 and 1/48.

Such true-to-the-original miniatures enable viewers of museum technology history to get an "overview", not only of the individual exhibit (sometimes even as the only possibility of a three-dimensional display if there is no longer a preserved original), but also of lines of development in aircraft construction by means of the possible arrangement and juxtaposition here; sometimes they even close gaps in the presentation of the originals. Their craftsmanship alone is a pleasure to behold.

Today we present the Fokker D VII as "Model of the Month". Various miniatures of this probably best German fighter plane in World War 1 can be found in the showcases of exhibition hall 1.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Fok DVII a

The black metal struts on Göring's machine were also painted white, at least at times.

 

The Model: Fokker D VII (Revell, 1/72)

This kit of the US-American Revell company with 29 parts and decals was part of the Californians' assortment since the 1960s. From time to time the kit, unchanged in casting, got a new decal set and a new cardboard image, while it accompanied generations of young modelers. The struts and wing profiles, which are clearly too strong by today's standards, ensured a high stability of the model and a low frustration rate of the customers.

Our example presented here in the picture was brought to the European market in 1993 by Revell AG in Bünde and offered two decorations to choose from: the colorful aircraft of First Lieutenant Rudolf Berthold and the all-white aircraft of the last Commodore of JG 1, Hermann Göring, both from 1918.

Fok DVII a

All in all, 680 kg of wood, fabric, metal and rubber - that, excellently combined, was enough to dominate the skies in 1918... The replica gets by with a few grams of polystyrene.

The original:                                    The best for last

After the first real fighter in service, the E I/ II/ III of 1915/16, Fokker Flugzeugwerke also built the most powerful fighter of the First World War: The Fokker D VII, winner of the German fighter competition in January 1918. This plane had been developed by chief designer Reinhold Platz with substantial participation of the founder of "Fokker Aeroplanbau" in Schwerin, Anthony Fokker himself, to equalize the air superiority gained by the Allies on the Western Front in late 1917.

The conventionally designed single-seat biplane with rigid undercarriage and 6-cylinder in-line Mercedes D IIIa engine, later also a BMW IIIa, was armed with two synchronized 08/15 machine guns. With a length of 6.95 m, it had a wingspan of 8.90 m; its top speed was 205 km/h with the BMW 6-cylinder in-line engine. The fuselage was fabric-covered over welded tubular steel frames, as had been done in previous Fokker designs. The wings were made of wood, also fabric-covered and braced to each other as well as to the fuselage. The vertical and horizontal stabilizers were fabric-covered tubular steel structures. This resulted in a remarkable structural strength of the aircraft, which manifested itself in superior stability with high maneuverability.

Fok DVII a

The wingspan of 8.90 m has been reduced in the model to just over 12.3 cm. The wings of the original were effectively cantilevered, but additionally braced among each other.bt.

Technically mature

The first D VIIs reached operational units in April 1918 and by June were already considered by British and French pilots to be the most dangerous enemy. Superbly balanced, fiercely efficient and good-natured, the D VII was extremely popular with its pilots, who were still achieving considerable numbers of kills in the last six months of the war with what was probably the most technically advanced aircraft of its time.

In fact, the Fokker D VII was the only aircraft type explicitly mentioned at the top of the Allied list of armaments to be delivered by the defeated Reich. To prevent the complete dismantling and removal of the production facilities by the victorious powers, Anthony Fokker and his staff transported what was transportable by rail to his Dutch homeland, which had remained neutral. Here he reestablished the company in Amsterdam - and brought the D VII to the Dutch armed forces as an "inaugural gift". Production of the type then continued for another nine years until 1928, and by the mid-1930s the last of the approximately 3,300 built were in active service. Among the 19 countries that eventually used this type, besides Germany and the Netherlands, were Denmark, Switzerland and the United States. The British and French intensively tested their prey machines, and the knowledge gained from this was incorporated into the following designs.

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Fok DVII a

What at first glance appeared somewhat angular on the D VII proved to be a compact force in action. This allowed the machine to fire stably "hanging from the propeller" upward

Fok DVII a

Bottom view of the Fokker D VII. This perspective also conveys the no-frills functionality of the design.  

Steffen Bartels, Hildesheimer Str. 400, 30880 Laatzen OT Rethen 8. January 2022

Contribution to the website "Model of the Month" at the Aviation Museum Hannover-Laatzen

Andere Prioritäten…

The Heinkel He 178 V-1

He178 1 
Heinkel He 178, the world's first jet aircraft, here in 1/72 scale from Condor/ MPM.

 

From original to model

An independent part of the collections of the Luftfahrtmuseum Hannover-Laatzen are the more than 1,000 scale models, mainly of the international standards 1/72 and 1/48.

Such true-to-the-original miniatures enable viewers of the history of technology in museums to get an "overview", not only of the individual exhibit (sometimes even as the only possibility of a three-dimensional display if there is no surviving original), but also of the lines of development of aircraft construction through the possible arrangement and juxtaposition. Sometimes they even close gaps in the presentation of the originals. Their craftsmanship alone is a pleasure to behold.

In our series 'Model of the Month' this time we present the Heinkel He 178 V-1, the first jet in aviation history.

The original was destroyed during Allied air raids on Berlin in 1943. The Aviation Museum is displaying a 1/72 scale model made by its long-time scale model and diorama builder Siegfried Fricke in a display case in Hangar 2.

He178 2 

The wingspan of the small shoulder wing was only 7.20 m in the original.

 

The model: The Heinkel jet in scale 1/72

The Czech manufacturer Condor/ MPM released this model in 36 parts of very nice quality, including photo-etched parts in the mid-1990s. The kit is a jewel of any collection also due to the historical significance of its prototype.

The original: aerodrome rounds for eternity

Ernst Udet, Generaluftzeugmeister of the German Air Force, previously the most successful surviving fighter pilot of the First World War,  an aircraft designer and world-renowned aerobatic pilot, did not find it remarkably exciting what Ernst Heinkel enthusiastically told him on the telephone in the very early morning of 27 August 1939: his team had just put the world's first turbine air jet-powered aircraft into the air.

An understandable misjudgement on Udet's part, for hardly anyone in the world at the time had any idea that this launch into the jet age was the beginning of aviation as we know it today. Supersonic and eventually hypersonic flights, from modern world air transport to global military strategy: all this began with a small, 7.48 m short and single-seat shoulder-wing aircraft made of wood and steel with a jet engine in the fuselage, which Heinkel chief pilot Erich Warsitz had piloted twice that day over the factory airfield in Rostock-Marienehe.

The designer of the turbine air jet engine was the physicist Dr. Hans-J. Pabst von Ohain and his assistant Max Hahn, whom Heinkel had engaged in 1936. This HE S 3b, powered by petrol, developed around 500 kp of thrust, which could accelerate the He 178 to 700 km/h with its take-off mass of 1,998 kg.

He178 2
The He 178 completed all its flights with the wheels extended and the landing gear wells covered.

 

Other priorities

A handful of successful test flights followed, but they never left the vicinity of Heinkel Flugzeugwerke before the project was abandoned for lack of official interest. The war had begun and demanded front-line capable and combat-ready equipment, not visions.

Udet, as head of the Luftwaffe's Technical Office, saw this world record on the eve of the war, like the first flight of a rocket aircraft by Heinkel-Werke only two months earlier with the He 176, more as a technical gimmick. For him it was a pleasing but futile art but not a useful contribution to military (or even civilian) aviation. Especially since 14 months earlier he had flown the prototype of the He 100 A, a propeller fighter, to a land speed record of 635 km/h. Such aircraft of tried and tested technology were not only a technical gimmick, but also a piece of art. Such aircraft of proven technology were safe and met the demands of the coming war. This was the dominant view in the Reich Aviation Ministry. Jet aircraft were to be taken care of after the victory. A double mistake: Germany built the best jets after those first ones during the war, but these flew straight into surrender...

Ahead of its time

Ernst Heinkel, who was not a sympathiser of National Socialism, but who, as a designer of both civilian and military aircraft with a worldwide reputation, had also become the main supplier of armaments to the Wehrmacht. He  was in fact initially pursuing purely scientific goals with the "He 176 and 178" project. The aim was to increase flight speed while at the same time significantly improving the mass/power ratio of the engines. This was only possible with new engines, the rocket engine and above all the turbine air jet engine.

But the knowledge gained here was ahead of its time and of course militarily groundbreaking. About three years later, the "turbo" Messerschmitt Me 262, the most powerful fighter of the Second World War, the Arado Ar 234, the first long-range jet reconnaissance aircraft and bomber, and the Me 163 rocket fighter, the fastest aircraft in the world, were flying, and both the British and the Americans were working feverishly to equalise the German lead in "jets". They - like the Soviet Union - only succeeded in doing so after the German defeat. However, after the intercontinental bomber, the victors then took care of world air traffic with this new technology, while the Germans were not even allowed to fly gliders until 1951.             

Were we able to arouse your curiosity? If so, we would be delighted to welcome you to the Aviation Museum in Ulmer Straße opposite the Hanover Exhibition Grounds! 

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He178 2 

One of hundreds of fascinating models that the Aviation Museum and its visitors owe to the unforgotten Siegfried Fricke.


He178 5 
The construction plan of the Czech kit from the 1990s.